HHomeBackground Color:He
LiBePhosphorus Pictures PageBlack White GrayBCNOFNe
NaMgPhosphorus Technical DataAlSiPSClAr
KCaPhosphorus Isotope DataScTiVCrMnFeCoNiCuZnGaGeAsSeBrKr
RbSrYZrNbMoTcRuRhPdAgCdInSnSbTeIXe
CsBaLaCePrNdPmSmEuGdTbDyHoErTmYbLuHfTaWReOsIrPtAuHgTlPbBiPoAtRn
FrRaAcThPaUNpPuAmCmBkCfEsFmMdNoLrRfDbSgBhHsMtDsRgCnUutUuqUupUuhUusUuo
Phosphorus     

Phosphorus

Atomic Weight 30.973761
Density 1.823 g/cm3
Melting Point 44.2 °C[note]
Boiling Point 280.5 °C[note]
Full technical data

Phosphorus occurs in white (extremely dangerous), red (safer and common in matches) and black (rare, most stable) forms. This exotic violet form is a mixture of red and black, not a true allotrope itself.

Scroll down to see examples of Phosphorus.
The Elements book Mad Science book Periodic Table Poster  Click here to buy a book, photographic periodic table poster, card deck, or 3D print based on the images you see here!
Phosphorus Match safe

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Match safe.
Iron match safe designed to hold matches. These were more important to have back when matches were less well developed and more likely to go off by accident.
Source: eBay seller dhenry102
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 17 October, 2009
Text Updated: 18 October, 2009
Price: $5
Size: 4"
Purity: 0%
Phosphorus Kitchen matches

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Kitchen matches.
Ordinary kitchen matches.
Source: Grocery Store
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 17 October, 2009
Text Updated: 18 October, 2009
Price: $1
Size: 2"
Purity: <3%
Phosphorus Tin match box

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Tin match box.
Listed under phosphorus because it was designed to contain potentially dangerous old matches. From the seller:
This very old tin box from R.Bell & Co., London contained "Not Under 140 Matches" according to the embossed legend on the front. Top says Bell established in 1832 and this box is certainly at least 100 years old. In worn but sound condition.

Source: eBay seller hispls
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 16 April, 2009
Text Updated: 23 April, 2009
Price: $4
Size: 3"
Purity: 0%
Phosphorus Home-made matches in holder

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Home-made matches in holder.
As you can see from this and other samples I have listed under phosphorus, there are a variety of styles of "match safes" that were in apparently common use in the past. Why don't you have a match safe today? Because matches no longer tend to ignite themselves spontaneously. Early matches were chemically unstable and had a tendency to decide on there own when a good time to light might be, explaining the popularity of metal boxes designed to contain this situation.
To make the point, and because I am genuinely concerned about them, I have stocked this holder with a few of the home-made matches I made for one of my Popular Science columns a few years ago. I have no idea how long they will last before spontaneously combusting.
Source: Theodore Gray
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 16 April, 2009
Text Updated: 17 April, 2009
Price: Priceless
Size: 3"
Purity: <10%
Phosphorus Beautiful match block

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Beautiful match block.
What a clever presentation of matches! You're meant to break them off as needed, but of course the object is far too beautiful to actually use.
Source: Design Pyrenees
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 2 April, 2009
Text Updated: 3 April, 2009
Price: $40
Size: 5"
Purity: <5%
Phosphorus Waterproof matches

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Waterproof matches.
Any type of match that must be struck on the box, whether it's a common kitchen match or these waterproof camping matches, has one thing in common: The striking surface contains red phosphorus, the key ingredient in getting the match to light.
Source: Walmart
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 8 February, 2008
Text Updated: 8 February, 2009
Price: $2
Size: 2"
Purity: <3%
Phosphorus Kitchen matches

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Kitchen matches.
Strike-on-box matches are safer than strike-anywhere matches because the matches themselves don't contain all the chemicals needed to get them to light. The key trigger, red phosphorus, is contained in the striking surface on the outside of the box. This also means that you know this surface must contain red phosphorus, unlike the striking surface on a box of strike-anywhere matches, which is just sandpaper.
Source: Walmart
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 8 February, 2008
Text Updated: 8 February, 2009
Price: $2
Size: 5"
Purity: <3%
Phosphorus Really white phosphorus

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Really white phosphorus.
White phosphorus is almost always tinged with yellow. So much so that "yellow phosphorus" is an alternate name for this allotrope of phosphorus. Why? Because white phosphorus turns yellow spontaneously on exposure to light. Kind of like those quantum mechanical phenomena that you can't observe without changing: If you look at your white phosphorus too long, it will turn yellow. But fortunately not too fast: I photographed 360 frames of this ampule rotating around a complete circle, which takes half an hour, and it did not become noticeable yellow. I had turned my studio lights as low as I could, under full intensity illumination, and certainly under sunlight, it probably would have developed some yellow in that time.
Now that it's been photographed, this ampule will stay in the dark until there's a really good reason to get it out again.
Source: Ivan Timokhin
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 28 December, 2006
Text Updated: 21 January, 2007
Price: Donated
Size: 1/4"
Purity: 99.99%
The Elements book Mad Science book Periodic Table Poster  Click here to buy a book, photographic periodic table poster, card deck, or 3D print based on the images you see here!
Phosphorus M34 White phosphorus hand grenade

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M34 White phosphorus hand grenade.
This is an inert shell that, if active, would be filled with 15 ounces of white phosphorus and a small charge that distributes it over a 35 meter radius when set off. Anyone in that area without protection would be severely burned and/or poisoned, and flammable material would likely end up in flames. Interestingly, the average soldier is said to be able to throw it approximately 30 meters, 5 meters short of its radius of destruction. Much larger white phosphorus incendiary bombs were used in WWII and probably still are: Compared to them this is just a baby.
Interestingly, descriptions you can find on the web say this grenade, which is considered an obsolete design, can also be used to create a smoke screen or signal. The smoke created is phosphorus pentoxide, which is actually not particularly toxic, and it's said that the high temperature at which the white phosphorus is burning causes the smoke to rise rapidly, making it more suitable for signaling purposes than for creating a smoke screen.
Source: eBay seller finch34
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 20 October, 2005
Price: $61
Size: 5"
Purity: 0%
Phosphorus Home made match

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Home made match.
I wrote an article about making matches for my popular science column: This is a picture of one of them burning. In the story for this sample (click storybook icon) I give more details and more pictures than appear in the magazine, showing all the steps needed to make matches like this.
Source: Theodore Gray
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 20 October, 2005
Price: Donated
Size: 1"
Purity: 5%
Phosphorus Black Phosphorus

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Black Phosphorus.
This black phosphorus was made by Max Whitby using the strange combination of heat and pressure needed to convert the red allotrope into black. Amazingly, one of the required ingredients to make black phosphorus is a seed crystal of black phosphorus. Hm. Which came first, the chicken or the chicken?
Source: Max Whitby of RGB
Contributor: Max Whitby of RGB
Acquired: 15 May, 2005
Price: Donated
Size: 0.1"
Purity: >99%
Phosphorus Violet Phosphorus

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Violet Phosphorus.
Phosphorus has all sorts of allotropes (different physical forms of the same element), which come in many colors: Red, black, and white being the only real ones (and white being the most dangerous by far). Violet phosphorus is a mixture of the red and black allotropes, quite unusual, and it was made by Max Whitby himself using one of the strange recipes of heat, pressure, and catalysts needed to transform phosphorus among its various crystal structures.

I chose this sample to represent its element in my Photographic Periodic Table Poster. The sample photograph includes text exactly as it appears in the poster, which you are encouraged to buy a copy of.
Periodic Table Poster

Source: Max Whitby of RGB
Contributor: Max Whitby of RGB
Acquired: 15 May, 2005
Text Updated: 4 May, 2007
Price: Donated
Size: 0.1"
Purity: >99%
Phosphorus Red Phosphorus powder ampouled under argon

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Red Phosphorus powder ampouled under argon.
This is fairly safe red phosphorus ampouled under argon to keep it dry and clean. This sample was donated by Dave Roberts of DePauw University, who I got to know while I was installing the beautiful periodic table display that now graces their Julian Science Center. Dave found a bunch of surplus elements in their chemical storeroom, and naturally Max Whitby and I graciously offered to take them off his hands.
Source: Dave Roberts
Contributor: Dave Roberts
Acquired: 1 November, 2003
Text Updated: 11 August, 2007
Price: Donated
Size: 0.8"
Purity: 99.999%
Sample Group: Powders
Phosphorus Sample from the Everest Set

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Sample from the Everest Set.
Up until the early 1990's a company in Russia sold a periodic table collection with element samples. At some point their American distributor sold off the remaining stock to a man who is now selling them on eBay. The samples (except gases) weigh about 0.25 grams each, and the whole set comes in a very nice wooden box with a printed periodic table in the lid.

To learn more about the set you can visit my page about element collecting for a general description and information about how to buy one, or you can see photographs of all the samples from the set displayed on my website in a periodic table layout or with bigger pictures in numerical order.

Source: Rob Accurso
Contributor: Rob Accurso
Acquired: 7 February, 2003
Text Updated: 29 January, 2009
Price: Donated
Size: 0.2"
Purity: >99%
Phosphorus Sample from the RGB Set

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Sample from the RGB Set.
The Red Green and Blue company in England sells a very nice element collection in several versions. Max Whitby, the director of the company, very kindly donated a complete set to the periodic table table.

To learn more about the set you can visit my page about element collecting for a general description or the company's website which includes many photographs and pricing details. I have two photographs of each sample from the set: One taken by me and one from the company. You can see photographs of all the samples displayed in a periodic table format: my pictures or their pictures. Or you can see both side-by-side with bigger pictures in numerical order.

The picture on the left was taken by me. Here is the company's version (there is some variation between sets, so the pictures sometimes show different variations of the samples):


Source: Max Whitby of RGB
Contributor: Max Whitby of RGB
Acquired: 25 January, 2003
Text Updated: 11 August, 2007
Price: Donated
Size: 0.2"
Purity: 99%
Phosphorus Red Phosphorus powder

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Red Phosphorus powder.
Phosphorus comes in several allotropic forms. Red phosphorus is reasonably safe, and not likely to spontaneously explode or anything. Not so white phosphorus: That has to be kept under water, or preferably not kept at all. It's the form that glows in the dark because of the spontaneous reaction with air on its surface. Funny how the bonding structure can make such a difference.

Click the source link for an interesting story about where this sample came from.
Source: Tryggvi Emilsson and Timothy Brumleve
Contributor: Tryggvi Emilsson and Timothy Brumleve
Acquired: 6 September, 2002
Text Updated: 16 April, 2009
Price: Donated
Size: 0.75"
Purity: >99%
Sample Group: Powders
Phosphorus Kitchen matches

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Kitchen matches.
Boy, if these were chemicals the warnings on them would be a mile wide. Caution! Pyrophoric! May spontaneously ignite with friction! Wear appropriate protective gear when handling this substance! Never expose to heat or rough handling! Probably the second most dangerous element I have after cesium. These are strike-anywhere matches which contain a small amount of red phosphorus in the head. Strike-on-box matches contain phosphorus only in the striking surface, not in the match itself.

I remember years ago, I couldn't have been more than ten, making rockets out of matches and tin (aluminum) foil. You wrap the head of the match and about half way up the stick in several layers of foil, being sure to seal the part around the head well. Then you prop it head end down on some more foil and hold a lit match to the foil down where the head of the match is. After a few seconds the match inside the foil will light, and the gas generated will propel the match out of the foil barrel and several feet down the sidewalk.
I remember doing this mainly with cardboard matches such as you get in a matchbook, but I don't see why it wouldn't work with kitchen matches too. It works because the match head contains both a fuel and an oxidizer, so you don't need any air inside the foil for the match to burn.

Source: Grocery Store
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 12 June, 2002
Text Updated: 2 March, 2006
Price: $2
Size: 2"
Purity: <20%
Phosphorus Xenotime

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Xenotime.
Sample of xenotime.
Source: Jensan Scientifics
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 24 March, 2009
Text Updated: 25 March, 2009
Price: Anonymous
Size: 0.125"
Composition: (YbY)PO4
The Elements book Mad Science book Periodic Table Poster  Click here to buy a book, photographic periodic table poster, card deck, or 3D print based on the images you see here!
Phosphorus Turquoise

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Turquoise.
Sample of turquoise.
Source: Jensan Scientifics
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 24 March, 2009
Text Updated: 25 March, 2009
Price: Anonymous
Size: 2"
Composition: Cu(Al,Fe)6[(OH)4(PO4)2]2.4H2O
Phosphorus Kolbeckite

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Kolbeckite.
Sample of kolbeckite.
Source: eBay seller d-h-garske
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 24 March, 2009
Text Updated: 25 March, 2009
Price: $50
Size: 2"
Composition: ScPO4.2H2O
Phosphorus Metatorbernite

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Metatorbernite.
Description from the source:
Metatorbernite ( Cu+2 (UO2)2 (PO4)2x8H2O tet.), Monte Painter, Australia. Green laminar crystals on limonitic, rich in oxides matrix. 6,5x5x3 cm; 87 g.
Source: Simone Citon
Contributor: John Gray
Acquired: 11 March, 2009
Text Updated: 12 March, 2009
Price: Trade
Size: 2.5"
Composition: Cu(UO2)2(PO4)2.8H2O
Phosphorus Frilled dragon skull

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Frilled dragon skull.
I've always wanted to buy something from The Bone Room and I finally settled on this pretty Frilled Dragon skull. It's some kind of lizard, and very complex inside, look at the 3D rotation video to see all the internal structures.
Source: The Bone Room
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 8 February, 2009
Text Updated: 8 February, 2009
Price: $70
Size: 2"
Composition: Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2
Phosphorus Pyromorphite

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Pyromorphite.
Description from the source:
Pyromorphite (Pb5 (PO4)3 Cl hex.), Daoping Mine, China. Little, but very nice crystal group. 1x1x0,8 cm; 2 g.
Source: Simone Citon
Contributor: John Gray
Acquired: 28 January, 2009
Text Updated: 29 January, 2009
Price: Trade
Size: 0.4"
Composition: Pb5(PO4)3Cl
The Elements book Mad Science book Periodic Table Poster  Click here to buy a book, photographic periodic table poster, card deck, or 3D print based on the images you see here!
Phosphorus Pyromorphite

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Pyromorphite.
Description from the source:
Pyromorphite (Pb5 (PO4)3 Cl hex.), Bad Ems, Germany. Little but evident crystal cluster. 0,8x0,5x0,4 cm; 9 g with box.
Source: Simone Citon
Contributor: John Gray
Acquired: 28 January, 2009
Text Updated: 29 January, 2009
Price: Trade
Size: 0.3"
Composition: Pb5(PO4)3Cl
Phosphorus Monazite

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Monazite.
Description from the source:
Monazite ( (Ce La Nd Th) P O4 mon.), Steli near Tveit, Iveland, Nordge. Extremely well crystallized example. 0,8x0,4x0,4 cm; 5 g with box.
Source: Simone Citon
Contributor: John Gray
Acquired: 28 January, 2009
Text Updated: 29 January, 2009
Price: Trade
Size: 0.3"
Composition: (CeLaNdTh)PO4
Phosphorus Apatite from Jensan Set

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Apatite from Jensan Set.
This sample represents terbium in the "The Grand Tour of the Periodic Table" mineral collection from Jensan Scientifics. Visit my page about element collecting for a general description, or see photographs of all the samples from the set in a periodic table layout or with bigger pictures in numerical order.
Source: Jensan Scientifics
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 10 January, 2009
Text Updated: 10 January, 2009
Price: Anonymous
Size: 0.6"
Composition: Tb.Ca5(PO4)3F
Phosphorus Photo Card Deck of the Elements

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Photo Card Deck of the Elements.
In late 2006 I published a photo periodic table and it's been selling well enough to encourage me to make new products. This one is a particularly neat one: A complete card deck of the elements with one big five-inch (12.7cm) square card for every element. If you like this site and all the pictures on it, you'll love this card deck. And of course if you're wondering what pays for all the pictures and the internet bandwidth to let you look at them, the answer is people buying my posters and cards decks. Hint hint.
Source: Theodore Gray
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 19 November, 2008
Text Updated: 21 November, 2008
Price: $35
Size: 5"
Composition: HHeLiBeBCNOFNeNaMg AlSiPSClArKCaScTiVCrMn FeCoNiCuZnGaGeAsSeBrKr RbSrYZrNbMoTcRuRhPdAg CdInSnSbTeIXeCsBaLaCePr NdPmSmEuGdTbDyHoErTm YbLuHfTaWReOsIrPtAuHgTl PbBiPoAtRnFrRaAcThPaUNp PuAmCmBkCfEsFmMdNoLrRf DbSgBhHsMtDsRgUubUutUuq UupUuhUusUuo
Phosphorus Cornetite

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Cornetite.
Description from the source:
Cornetite (Cu+23(PO4) (OH)3 orth.), Shaba, Rep. Dem. of Congo. Rare crystal sections on matrix. 3,2x2x0,8 cm; 4 g.
Source: Simone Citon
Contributor: John Gray
Acquired: 30 October, 2008
Text Updated: 31 October, 2008
Price: Trade
Size: 1.25"
Composition: Cu+23(PO4) (OH)3
The Elements book Mad Science book Periodic Table Poster  Click here to buy a book, photographic periodic table poster, card deck, or 3D print based on the images you see here!
Phosphorus Apatite

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Apatite.
Description from the source:
Apatite (Ca5 (PO4)3 F hex.), Otter Lake, Quebec, Canada. Isolated well formed crystal with high lustre. 4,5x2,5x1,5 cm; 35 g.
Source: Simone Citon
Contributor: John Gray
Acquired: 30 September, 2008
Text Updated: 1 October, 2008
Price: Trade
Size: 1.75"
Composition: Ca5(PO4)3F
Phosphorus Wavellite

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Wavellite.
Description from the source:
Wavellite (Al3 (PO4)2 (OH,F)3x5H2O orth.), Maulding, Montgomery, Arkansas, USA. Nice spherical crystal clusters on matrix with green color, better than the photo. 7,2x4x3,5 cm; 63 g.
Source: Simone Citon
Contributor: John Gray
Acquired: 30 September, 2008
Text Updated: 1 October, 2008
Price: Trade
Size: 2.8"
Composition: Al3(PO4)2(OH,F)3.5H2O
Phosphorus Wavellite

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Wavellite.
Description from the source:
Wavellite (Al3 (PO4)2 (OH,F)3x5H2O orth.), Tom's Quarry, Kapunda, South Australia, Australia. Radiating colorless crystals on limonitic matrix, from a rich in phosphates locality. 1,9x1x0,8 cm; 3 g.
Source: Simone Citon
Contributor: John Gray
Acquired: 30 September, 2008
Text Updated: 1 October, 2008
Price: Trade
Size: 0.75"
Composition: Al3(PO4)2(OH,F)3.5H2O
Phosphorus Fluellite

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Fluellite.
Description from the source:
Fluellite (Al2(PO4)F2(OH).7H2O orth.), Tom's Quarry, Kapunda, South Australia, Australia. Rare crystals on the phosphatic matrix. 3x2,7x2 cm; 15 g.
Source: Simone Citon
Contributor: John Gray
Acquired: 26 September, 2008
Text Updated: 28 September, 2008
Price: Trade
Size: 1.2"
Composition: Al2(PO4)F2(OH).7H2O
Phosphorus Hydroxilherderite

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Hydroxilherderite.
Description from the source:
Hydroxilherderite (CaBe(PO4).(OH) mon.), Linopolis, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Geminated, good rare crystal. 3,2x2x1,5 cm; 10 g.
Source: Simone Citon
Contributor: John Gray
Acquired: 26 September, 2008
Text Updated: 28 September, 2008
Price: Trade
Size: 1.25"
Composition: CaBe(PO4).(OH)
The Elements book Mad Science book Periodic Table Poster  Click here to buy a book, photographic periodic table poster, card deck, or 3D print based on the images you see here!
Phosphorus Monazite Crystal

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Monazite Crystal.
This is a lustrous crystal of monazite from Kitsamby, Madagascar. Rare, expensive, and radioactive: What more could you ask of a mineral?
Source: eBay seller mineralman999
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 20 September, 2005
Price: $140
Size: 1.5"
Composition: (Ce,La,Nd,Th)PO4
Phosphorus Monazite Sand

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Monazite Sand.
Monazite is a thorium-bearing mineral that occurs in sand deposits in a number of places around the world. Only a small proportion of the sand in this sample is actually monazite: It is probably somewhat selected compared to normally occurring sand deposits, but not much. It's kind of remarkable, really, that you can collect thorium just by scooping it up with a shovel.
Source: Max Whitby of RGB
Contributor: Max Whitby of RGB
Acquired: 20 September, 2005
Price: Donated
Size: 1.5"
Composition: (Ce,La,Nd,Th)PO4
Phosphorus Autunite

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Autunite.
This autunite was donated by the mine owner who dug it up: It's a lovely specimen, photographed here under ultraviolet light. The main picture for this sample actually shows the back side of the sample, which has some very nice large crystals. The front side is completely covered with more autunite crystals: Click the turntable icon on the right to get an image you can rotate around and see from all sides.
You can get samples of this an other radioactive minerals direct from the mine.
Source: eBay seller boomologist
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 25 June, 2005
Price: Donated
Size: 1.5"
Composition: Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2.10H2O
Phosphorus Autunite

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Autunite.
This autunite was donated by the mine owner who dug it up: It's a lovely specimen, photographed here under ultraviolet light. You can get samples of this an other radioactive minerals direct from the mine.
Source: eBay seller boomologist
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 25 June, 2005
Price: Donated
Size: 1.5"
Composition: Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2.10H2O
Phosphorus Torbernite

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Torbernite.
A fairly large torbernite encrustation.
Source: United Nuclear
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 10 September, 2005
Price: $100
Size: 2.5"
Composition: Cu(UO2)2(PO4)2.8-12H2O
The Elements book Mad Science book Periodic Table Poster  Click here to buy a book, photographic periodic table poster, card deck, or 3D print based on the images you see here!
Phosphorus Torbernite

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Torbernite.
Another lovely green torbernite, more matrix and less crystal on this one.
Source: eBay seller billrka
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 3 June, 2005
Price: $20
Size: 1.5"
Composition: Cu(UO2)2(PO4)2.8-12H2O
Phosphorus Torbernite

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Torbernite.
Torbernite is a lovely, lovely green color (I would guess from the copper). It's also quite radioactive, from the uranium content, and even more so from the mixture of uranium decay products that have built up in it over millions of years.
Source: eBay seller migalf1
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 3 June, 2005
Price: $27
Size: 1.5"
Composition: Cu(UO2)2(PO4)2.8-12H2O
Phosphorus Autunite

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Autunite.
Autunite, if it is not kept in a humid environment, tends to degrade due to loss of water from the crystal matrix (see formula below, which indicates there are 10 molecules of water associated with each atom of uranium). This sample flaked apart as I was trying to mount it for photography, dropping little leaves of radioactivity everywhere. Still, quite pretty.
Source: eBay seller dr**zarkoff
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 10 June, 2005
Price: $15
Size: 0.5"
Composition: Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2.10H2O
Phosphorus Autunite

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Autunite.
I bought some Fiestaware plates from Jim to use in museum displays I'm helping coordinate, and he threw in this little sample of Autunite, a uranium mineral. He probably has Fiestaware available if you need some.
Source: Jim Markitell
Contributor: Jim Markitell
Acquired: 30 May, 2003
Price: Donated
Size: 1.5"
Composition: Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2.10H2O
Phosphorus Triphylite from Jensan Set

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Triphylite from Jensan Set.
This sample represents phosphorus in the "The Grand Tour of the Periodic Table" mineral collection from Jensan Scientifics. Visit my page about element collecting for a general description, or see photographs of all the samples from the set in a periodic table layout or with bigger pictures in numerical order.
Source: Jensan Scientifics
Contributor: Jensan Scientifics
Acquired: 17 March, 2003
Text Updated: 28 November, 2007
Price: Donated
Size: 1"
Composition: LiFePO4
The Elements book Mad Science book Periodic Table Poster  Click here to buy a book, photographic periodic table poster, card deck, or 3D print based on the images you see here!