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Antimony     

Antimony

Atomic Weight 121.76
Density 6.697 g/cm3
Melting Point 630.63 °C
Boiling Point 1587 °C
Full technical data

Beautiful, sparkling lumps of broken crystal like this are how bulk antimony is commonly sold. Most of it is melted down and added to lead to make bullets and batteries or alloyed with other metals.

Scroll down to see examples of Antimony.
The Elements book Mad Science book Periodic Table Poster  Click here to buy a book, photographic periodic table poster, card deck, or 3D print based on the images you see here!
Antimony More antimony

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More antimony.
Just some more antimony. Pretty stuff.
Source: eBay seller hallmarkmetals
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 28 February, 2004
Text Updated: 1 November, 2009
Price: $2.60/pound
Size: 1.5"
Purity: 99.65%
Antimony Element coin

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Element coin.
Dave Hamric sells element samples under the name Metallium. He's developed a line of coins struck out of various common and uncommon metals: They are quite lovely, and very reasonably priced, considering the difficulty of creating some of them.
Here is the back side of this coin (click either picture to see it larger):

Click the Sample Group link below to see many other coins made of various elements, or click the link to his website above if you want to buy one like this.
This one is particularly funny: Money made out of anti-mony.
Source: Dave Hamric
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 30 September, 2007
Text Updated: 30 September, 2007
Price: $19
Size: 0.75"
Purity: >99%
Sample Group: Coins
Antimony Crystal from Oliver Sacks

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Crystal from Oliver Sacks.
This is a crystal of antimony I got from Oliver Sacks while on a visit to New York.
Source: Oliver Sacks
Contributor: Oliver Sacks
Acquired: 4 August, 2004
Price: Donated
Size: 2.5"
Purity: 99.65%
Antimony Broken crystal

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Broken crystal.
These are a few crystals from a box full I bought from Hall Mark Metals (who also sell on eBay, see source link). I was expecting bulk antimony in small, dull chunks, but it turned out that with a little washing up this material is beautiful just as it comes. The crystals are bright and shiny, similar in some ways to polycrystalline bismuth, though antimony does not form the interesting hopper crystals bismuth does.

I chose this sample to represent its element in my Photographic Periodic Table Poster. The sample photograph includes text exactly as it appears in the poster, which you are encouraged to buy a copy of.
Periodic Table Poster

Source: eBay seller hallmarkmetals
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 28 February, 2004
Text Updated: 11 August, 2007
Price: $2.60/pound
Size: 1.5"
Purity: 99.65%
Antimony Museum-grade sample

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Museum-grade sample.
In early 2004 Max Whitby and I started selling individual element samples identical or similar to the samples we use in the museum displays we build. These are top-quality samples presented in attractive forms appropriate to the particular element. They are for sale from Max's website and also on eBay where you will find an ever-changing selection of samples (click the link to see the current listings).
This vial of antimony contains 50+ grams of broken ingots showing the beautiful, almost bismuth-like crystal surfaces.
Source: Theodore Gray
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 24 February, 2004
Text Updated: 11 August, 2007
Price: See Listing
Size: 2"
Purity: >99%
Sample Group: RGB Samples
Antimony Museum-grade sample

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Museum-grade sample.
In early 2004 Max Whitby and I started selling individual element samples identical or similar to the samples we use in the museum displays we build. These are top-quality samples presented in attractive forms appropriate to the particular element. They are for sale from Max's website and also on eBay where you will find an ever-changing selection of samples (click the link to see the current listings).
This vial of antimony contains 50+ grams of broken ingots showing the beautiful, almost bismuth-like crystal surfaces.
Source: Theodore Gray
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 24 February, 2004
Text Updated: 11 August, 2007
Price: See Listing
Size: 2"
Purity: >99%
Sample Group: RGB Samples
Antimony Link in multi-metal chain

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Link in multi-metal chain.
I had been wondering about how hard it would be to make a multi-part graphite mold with which I could cast chain links around each other. That is, given an existing link, cast a new one interlinked with it. This turns out to be quite do-able: Here is the mold I made (using my drill press as a vertical mill and a round-ended router bit):

In case you ever want to try this, I'll give you an important hint: The third link is the real test, not the second one.

Using this mold I have cast a chain out of all the metals I can easily cast. Click the Sample Group link below to see all the links together.

This chain (counted as one sample) is the 600th sample added to my collection.

Source: www.theantimonyman.com
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 9 August, 2003
Text Updated: 20 February, 2006
Price: $1/pound
Size: 3"
Purity: 99.9%
Sample Group: Multi-metal Chain
Antimony Cast ingot

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Cast ingot.
I made this one-pound (approximately) ingot by casting molten antimony into a graphite mold. When it was cooled to the point I could pick it up with a paper towel, I noticed a must unusual thing: The block was pinging like a bowl of Rice Crispies made out of silver bells. It went on for minutes and was really quite beautiful, much nicer than the tin or indium cries one reads about. I wonder if it's a coincidence that three elements in a row in the periodic table, indium, tin, and antimony, all cry when cooled or bent. I hope to record this antimony sound soon.
Source: www.theantimonyman.com
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 8 August, 2003
Price: $4/pound
Size: 3.5"
Purity: 99.9%
The Elements book Mad Science book Periodic Table Poster  Click here to buy a book, photographic periodic table poster, card deck, or 3D print based on the images you see here!
Antimony Bulk Commercial Grade

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Bulk Commercial Grade.
This is nice clean bulk grade antimony metal, in the form of broken polycrystalline lumps. I've melted and cast this stuff (see next two samples) and it's really quite an odd metal to cast, probably because it's right on the line between being a metal and not a metal. I think it must have a very strong surface tension, because when pouring it doesn't want to get started, and it sort of goes in fits if you don't keep pouring rapidly.
Source: www.theantimonyman.com
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 7 August, 2003
Price: $4/pound
Size: 0.25"
Purity: 99.9%
Antimony Shiny crystals

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Shiny crystals.
These are very beautiful antimony crystals. The price is a little high compared to the bulk price of the metal, but these crystals are larger and shinier than bulk material.
Source: eBay seller ringman001
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 7 February, 2003
Price: $20/5 ounces
Size: 1"
Purity: 99.9%
Antimony Sample from the Everest Set

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Sample from the Everest Set.
Up until the early 1990's a company in Russia sold a periodic table collection with element samples. At some point their American distributor sold off the remaining stock to a man who is now selling them on eBay. The samples (except gases) weigh about 0.25 grams each, and the whole set comes in a very nice wooden box with a printed periodic table in the lid.

To learn more about the set you can visit my page about element collecting for a general description and information about how to buy one, or you can see photographs of all the samples from the set displayed on my website in a periodic table layout or with bigger pictures in numerical order.

Source: Rob Accurso
Contributor: Rob Accurso
Acquired: 7 February, 2003
Text Updated: 29 January, 2009
Price: Donated
Size: 0.2"
Purity: >99%
Antimony Sample from the RGB Set

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Sample from the RGB Set.
The Red Green and Blue company in England sells a very nice element collection in several versions. Max Whitby, the director of the company, very kindly donated a complete set to the periodic table table.

To learn more about the set you can visit my page about element collecting for a general description or the company's website which includes many photographs and pricing details. I have two photographs of each sample from the set: One taken by me and one from the company. You can see photographs of all the samples displayed in a periodic table format: my pictures or their pictures. Or you can see both side-by-side with bigger pictures in numerical order.

The picture on the left was taken by me. Here is the company's version (there is some variation between sets, so the pictures sometimes show different variations of the samples):


Source: Max Whitby of RGB
Contributor: Max Whitby of RGB
Acquired: 25 January, 2003
Text Updated: 11 August, 2007
Price: Donated
Size: 0.2"
Purity: 99.6%
Antimony Antimony Goblets

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Antimony Goblets.
I'm not sure about these goblets. They are stamped "E.P. ANTIMONY" and "JAPAN" on the bottom, so the seller was certainly justified in selling them as "Antimony Goblets".

Reader Paul Roberts suggests that maybe "E.P." stands for Electro Plated, which seems like a good guess. One of the goblets has a piece broken off its lip, so I scraped the plating off one side and analyzed the base metal by x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy at the Center for Microanalysis of Materials, University of Illinois (partially supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under grant DEFG02-91-ER45439).

The result is a complex alloy with the following components:
49% lead
23% antimony
10% tin
17% silver
1% copper

The silver part is probably either from incomplete scraping of what is obviously silver plate (based on how it tarnishes), or the machine is seeing some of the back side of the sample: I doubt very much that they would have wasted silver in the base metal.

So, there really is a good bit of antimony, but it's not the major component of the alloy. There are a whole lot of different alloys containing various mixtures of tin, antimony, lead, silver, and copper. They have names like "German silver", "Pewter", etc. Why some company decided to name this one after its antimony content I'm not sure: Maybe they just really didn't want to call it lead.

I suspect that my other "antimony" objects are made of similar sorts of alloys with varying amounts of antimony depending on what mine was close to the factory that made them.

Source: eBay seller cnull
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 16 October, 2002
Price: $1.04
Size: 7"
Purity: 23%
Antimony Hand Painted Miniature Antimony Models

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Hand Painted Miniature Antimony Models.
I guess including the element name on the packaging is no stranger than calling old metal toys "tin toys" or "cast iron banks". Somehow it just seems that way in this case. See the antimony goblets below for information about what the alloy is actually likely to be.
Source: eBay seller handmedownz
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 9 August, 2002
Price: $5
Size: 4"
Purity: >20%
Antimony Antique Jelly Jar

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Antique Jelly Jar.
Yet another item claimed to be made of antimony. I'm using this one for donations to support the apple bowl outside my office. See the antimony goblets below for information about what the alloy is actually likely to be.
Source: eBay seller maurineandken
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 25 July, 2002
Price: $30
Size: 4"
Purity: >20%
Antimony Foo Dog incense burner

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Foo Dog incense burner.
Another item claimed to be made of antimony. No verification, but no reason to doubt it either. Kind of cute. See the antimony goblets below for information about what the alloy is actually likely to be. I used to have this labeled as a "foo lion" incense burner because that's what the eBay seller described it as. But then reader Wendy Hart kindly pointed out that it's actually a dog, not a lion.
Source: eBay seller rmoy
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 25 July, 2002
Price: $5
Size: 3"
Purity: >20%
Antimony Crystals

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Crystals.
This is pure crystalline antimony.
Source: Mark Rollog
Contributor: Mark Rollog
Acquired: 20 July, 2002
Price: Donated
Size: 0.3"
Purity: >99%
Antimony Antique brooch pin

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Antique brooch pin.
Antimony is a major component of pewter, which is popular for making this sort of item out of. So it's perhaps not too far fetched that someone would make a pin like this out of plain antimony, though the only evidence for this is the unsubstantiated claim of the eBay seller. But why would he lie?
See the antimony goblets below for information about what the alloy is actually likely to be.
Source: eBay seller jnqmn
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 18 July, 2002
Text Updated: 29 January, 2009
Price: $5
Size: 3"
Purity: >20%
The Elements book Mad Science book Periodic Table Poster  Click here to buy a book, photographic periodic table poster, card deck, or 3D print based on the images you see here!
Antimony Himalayan sea salt

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Himalayan sea salt.
There is a list of 84 elements that seems to pop up repeatedly in the ingredient lists of "natural" mineral products, supplements, pills, and the like. Even, it turns out, in salt. Here then is the list of minerals claimed to be found in all-natural organic Himalayan sea salt:
hydrogen, lithium, beryllium, boron, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, fluoride, sodium, magnesium, aluminum, silicon, phosphorus, sulfur, chloride, calcium, scandium, titanium, vanadium, chromium, manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, gallium, germanium, arsenic, selenium, bromine, rubidium, strontium, yttrium, zirconium, niobium, molybdenum, ruthenium, rhodium palladium, silver, cadmium, indium, tin, antimony, tellurium, iodine, cesium, barium, lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, samarium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, dysprosium, holmium, erbium, thulium, ytterbium, lutetium, hafnium, tantalum, tungsten, rhenium, osmium, iridium, platinum, gold, mercury, thallium, lead, bismuth, polonium, astatine, francium, radium, actinium, thorium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium and plutonium.
I wish someone would tell these people that, for example, neptunium and plutonium do not occur in nature at all, let alone in salt. Unless, I suppose, if you count nuclear fallout as a "natural" source of ingredients.
What bothers me most is what this says about the level of scientific literacy, both of the people selling the stuff, and the people buying it. Does no one actually read the list? Or do they read it an not realize how preposterous it is? It's enough to make you despair for the future of mankind.
Pretty salt, though.
Source: eBay seller saltwonders
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 28 March, 2009
Text Updated: 4 April, 2009
Price: $15
Size: 0.25"
Composition: NaClSbCsDyErEuGdHfHoInLaLuNdPrSmScThTlTeTbTmYbY
Antimony Himalayan salt lamp

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Himalayan salt lamp.
A pretty hollow lamp made of solid rock salt from the Himalays. The composition I list is a partial list of the elements claimed to be in this type of salt (see my other Himalayan sea salt sample for a discussion of how silly this is).
Source: eBay seller saltwonders
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 28 March, 2009
Text Updated: 3 April, 2009
Price: $29
Size: 8"
Composition: NaClSbCsDyErEuGdHfHoInLaLuNdPrSmScThTlTeTbTmYbY
Antimony Insane mineral capsules

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Insane mineral capsules.
These minerals capsules are called "Immune Boost 77", from Morningstar Minerals. They are either being incredibly honest, or they really don't understand what they're saying when they list what amounts to nearly the entire periodic table on the label, as the "trace minerals" they contain.

Here is the list in all its glory, typed in by my daughter in exchange for my paying for a membership in the Miley Cyrus fan club: Antimony, Barium, Beryllium, Bismuth, Boron, Bromine, Calcium, Carbon, Cerium, Cesium, Chloride, Chromium, Cobalt, Copper, Dysprosium, Erbium, Europium, Florine, Gadolinium, Gallium, Germanium, Gold, Hafnium, Holmium, Indium, Iodine, Iridium, Iron, Lanthanum, Lithium, Lutetium, Magnesium, Manganese, Molybdenum, Neodymium, Niacin, Nickel, Niobium, Osmium, Palladium, Phosphorus, Platinum, Potassium, Praseodymium, Rhenium, Rhodium, Rubidium, Ruthenium, Samarium, Scandium, Selenium, Silicon, Silver, Sodium, Strontium, Sulfur, Tantalum, Thallium, Thorium, Tellurium, Terbium, Thulium, Tin, Titanium, Tungsten, Vanadium, Ytterbium, Yttrium, Zinc, Zirconium.

Some of them are just silly, like thulium, which has absolutely no biological function. Others are a bit scarier, like thallium and thorium that are deadly poisons, and tellurium, which makes you smell of rotten onions for weeks.

Basically what they've done is list everything that occurs in even trace amounts in mixed monazite sand, which is kind of what the stuff inside looks like. The only reason they aren't seriously harmful (I assume) is that most of these are not actually present in any meaningful quantity.

My attention is drawn to these and other similar mineral supplements every time I decide to see if anything interesting has popped up on eBay for one or another of the obscure rare earths. Generally speaking if you search eBay for those guys you get very little of interest unless you turn on the option to search the text of the item description as well as the titles. Then you get lots of trace mineral supplements that one can only hope don't actually contain them.

Source: eBay seller grandma-adams
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 24 March, 2009
Text Updated: 29 March, 2009
Price: $15
Size: 0.75"
Composition: SbCsDyErEuGdHfHoInLaLuNdPrSmScThTlTeTbTmYbY
Antimony Livingstonite

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Livingstonite.
Description from the source:
Livingstonite (Hg Sb4 S8 mon.), Municipio de Huitzuco, Guerrero, Mexico. Rare masses or micro acicular crystals on Anhydrite matrix. 3x2x2 cm; 12 g.
Source: Simone Citon
Contributor: John Gray
Acquired: 11 March, 2009
Text Updated: 12 March, 2009
Price: Trade
Size: 1.2"
Composition: HgSb4S8
Antimony Pyrargyrite

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Pyrargyrite.
Description from the source:
Pyrargyrite (Ag3 SbS3 trig.), San Genaro, Castrovvirreyna, Peru. Solid crystal cluster. 2,5x1,7x1,5 cm; 15 g with box.
Source: Simone Citon
Contributor: John Gray
Acquired: 11 March, 2009
Text Updated: 12 March, 2009
Price: Trade
Size: 1"
Composition: Ag3SbS3
The Elements book Mad Science book Periodic Table Poster  Click here to buy a book, photographic periodic table poster, card deck, or 3D print based on the images you see here!
Antimony Weissbergite from Jensan Set

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Weissbergite from Jensan Set.
This sample represents thallium in the "The Grand Tour of the Periodic Table" mineral collection from Jensan Scientifics. Visit my page about element collecting for a general description, or see photographs of all the samples from the set in a periodic table layout or with bigger pictures in numerical order.
Source: Jensan Scientifics
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 10 January, 2009
Text Updated: 10 January, 2009
Price: Anonymous
Size: 1"
Composition: TlSbS2
Antimony Native Antimony

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Native Antimony.
Description from the source:
Antimony (Sb trig.), Lac Nicolet Mine, Quebec, Canada. Cristalline mass. 3x2,2x1,6 cm; 32 g.
Source: Simone Citon
Contributor: John Gray
Acquired: 27 December, 2008
Text Updated: 28 December, 2008
Price: Trade
Size: 1.2"
Composition: Sb
Antimony Photo Card Deck of the Elements

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Photo Card Deck of the Elements.
In late 2006 I published a photo periodic table and it's been selling well enough to encourage me to make new products. This one is a particularly neat one: A complete card deck of the elements with one big five-inch (12.7cm) square card for every element. If you like this site and all the pictures on it, you'll love this card deck. And of course if you're wondering what pays for all the pictures and the internet bandwidth to let you look at them, the answer is people buying my posters and cards decks. Hint hint.
Source: Theodore Gray
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 19 November, 2008
Text Updated: 21 November, 2008
Price: $35
Size: 5"
Composition: HHeLiBeBCNOFNeNaMg AlSiPSClArKCaScTiVCrMn FeCoNiCuZnGaGeAsSeBrKr RbSrYZrNbMoTcRuRhPdAg CdInSnSbTeIXeCsBaLaCePr NdPmSmEuGdTbDyHoErTm YbLuHfTaWReOsIrPtAuHgTl PbBiPoAtRnFrRaAcThPaUNp PuAmCmBkCfEsFmMdNoLrRf DbSgBhHsMtDsRgUubUutUuq UupUuhUusUuo
Antimony Stibnite from Jensan Set

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Stibnite from Jensan Set.
This sample represents antimony in the "The Grand Tour of the Periodic Table" mineral collection from Jensan Scientifics. Visit my page about element collecting for a general description, or see photographs of all the samples from the set in a periodic table layout or with bigger pictures in numerical order.
Source: Jensan Scientifics
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 30 October, 2008
Text Updated: 31 October, 2008
Price: Anonymous
Size: 1"
Composition: Sb2S3
Antimony Getchellite

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Getchellite.
Description from the source:
Getchellite ( As Sb S3 mon.), Chaidarkan, Kirghizstan. Cleavage material with Stibnite on matrix. 2,2x1,8x1 cm; 6 g with box.
Source: Simone Citon
Contributor: John Gray
Acquired: 14 October, 2008
Text Updated: 14 October, 2008
Price: Trade
Size: 1"
Composition: AsSbS3
The Elements book Mad Science book Periodic Table Poster  Click here to buy a book, photographic periodic table poster, card deck, or 3D print based on the images you see here!
Antimony Stibnite

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Stibnite.
Description from the source:
Stibnite ( Sb2 S3 orth.), Herja, Maramures, Romania. Prismatic, elongated, steel gray crystals, very aesthetic. 7x6x3,5 cm; 140 g.
Source: Simone Citon
Contributor: John Gray
Acquired: 30 September, 2008
Text Updated: 1 October, 2008
Price: Trade
Size: 2.75"
Composition: Sb2S3
Antimony Pyrargyrite

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Pyrargyrite.
Description from the source:
Pyrargyrite (Ag3 SbS3 trig.), San Genaro, Castrovvirreyna, Peru. Similar (distinct geminated crystals). 1,4x1x1 cm; 5 g with box.
Source: Simone Citon
Contributor: John Gray
Acquired: 30 September, 2008
Text Updated: 30 September, 2008
Price: Trade
Size: 0.5"
Composition: Ag3SbS3
Antimony Antimony star target

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Antimony star target. (External Sample)
Antimony stars, formed when antimony metal cools in a circular pot, were popular with the alchemists. This is a very high-tech variation: It was made (and used) as a sputtering target. I'm not sure why someone would want an antimony sputtering target (used to coat something with antimony in a high vacuum chamber). But of course all you have to do is type "antimony sputtering" into google and you'll find out.
Location: Ethan Currens
Photographed: 4 September, 2007
Text Updated: 8 February, 2009
Size: 2"
Purity: >99%
Antimony Native antimony

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Native antimony. (External Sample)
Natural mineral sample.
Location: The Harvard Museum of Natural History
Photographed: 2 October, 2002
Text Updated: 6 September, 2007
Size: 4"
Purity: >90%
The Elements book Mad Science book Periodic Table Poster  Click here to buy a book, photographic periodic table poster, card deck, or 3D print based on the images you see here!