HHomeBackground Color:He
LiBeTin Main PageBlack White GrayBCNOFNe
NaMgTin Pictures PageAlSiPSClAr
KCaTin Technical DataScTiVCrMnFeCoNiCuZnGaGeAsSeBrKr
RbSrYZrNbMoTcRuRhPdAgCdInSnSbTeIXe
CsBaLaCePrNdPmSmEuGdTbDyHoErTmYbLuHfTaWReOsIrPtAuHgTlPbBiPoAtRn
FrRaAcThPaUNpPuAmCmBkCfEsFmMdNoLrRfDbSgBhHsMtDsRgCnUutUuqUupUuhUusUuo

Museum-grade sample.
An example of the element Tin

Sample Image    |    QuickTimeVR Rotation
Tin Museum-grade sample
Museum-grade sample.
In early 2004 Max Whitby and I started selling individual element samples identical or similar to the samples we use in the museum displays we build. These are top-quality samples presented in attractive forms appropriate to the particular element. They are for sale from Max's website and also on eBay where you will find an ever-changing selection of samples (click the link to see the current listings).
This sample shows the appearance of the metal when dropped into a bucket of water. The metal is taken to just barely above its melting point, then poured in from close to the water surface, a potentially dangerous operation particularly in the case of aluminum (which can form hydrogen gas that may explode). If the temperature is too high the metal fragments into an almost powder form, so it is a delicate matter to get just the right conditions for the formation of smooth shapes like this.
Source: Theodore Gray
Contributor: Theodore Gray
Acquired: 6 March, 2004
Text Updated: 11 August, 2007
Price: See Listing
Size: 1"
Purity: >99%
Sample Group: RGB Samples
The Elements book Mad Science book Periodic Table Poster  Click here to buy a book, photographic periodic table poster, card deck, or 3D print based on the images you see here!